THE GRAFIK GUITAR

My artist book The Grafik Guitar consists of 38 monoprints on the theme of the deconstruction of elements of the acoustic guitar, namely the machine head, tuning pegs, fretboard, strings and sound hole. The separate elements were carved in lino or wood then overlaid in various combinations and intensities to form composite monoprints. The Japanese creative print method (sosaku hanga) was adopted as part of the approach to this project using Japanese knives and chisels. The blocks were printed on Chinese paper with water colour ink, sumi and additional hand colouring.

GrafikGuitar 3-96

Linocut ink composite print over block print-© 1999 Michael Hill

GrafikGuitar 6-96

Linocut ink composite print over block print-© 1999 Michael Hill

GrafikGuitar 7-96

Linocut ink composite print over block print-© 1999 Michael Hill

GrafikGuitar 4-96

Linocut ink composite print over block print-© 1999 Michael Hill

GrafikGuitar 8-96

Linocut ink composite print over block print-© 1999 Michael Hill

GrafikGuitar 9-96

Linocut ink composite print over block print-© 1999 Michael Hill

GrafikGuitar 1-96

Single linocut ink print of strings and sound hole over block print-© 1999 Michael Hill

A design application of the work was made in the form of a poster, program cover and published conference proceedings cover for an international popular music studies conference in Sydney, IASPM 1999.

Scan

Conference proceedings cover design-© 1999 Michael Hill

Scan 1

Linocut of guitar elements-machine head, fretboard, strings and sound hole- arranged as visual communication design-© 1999 Michael Hill

For further development of this work see: BOOKBINDING THE GRAFIK GUITAR

Other posts of my graphic based material include:  CARTOON   MORE CARTOONS   RESEARCH CARTOONS    UNIVERSITY CARTOONS   POSTCARD    POSTCARD-Second Series   POSTCARD-Third Series   POSTCARD-Fourth Series   PRINT Fish Tai   PRINT Fish Two   SCRAPBOOK   SCRAPBOOK-More Pages   SCRAPBOOK-A Few Pages More  and the posts on production of my artist book/comic BLOTTING PAPER:  Issue #1: No.1   No.2   No.3   No.4   No.5   No.6   No.7   No.8   No.9   No.10   No.11   No.12   No.13   Issue #2: No.14   No.15   No.16   No.17   No.18   No.19   No.20   No.21   No.22   No.23   No.24   No.25   No.26   No.27   No.28   No.29   Issue #3: No.30   No.31   No.32   No.33   No.34   No.35   No.36   Issue #4: No.37   No.38   No.39   No.40   No.41   No.42   No.43   No.44   Issue #5: No.45   No.46   No.47   No.48

CARTOON

This post will feature a collection of my published cartoons of which there are around 30. Beginning with one of those I contributed to U: magazine whilst working at the University of Technology, Sydney. Subsequent cartoon posts will help me to grow online gallery of my single panel satirical work.

Satirical illustration to accompany article on changes in Sedition Law.

Satirical illustration to accompany article on changes in Sedition Law.

The cartoon on the article page.

The cartoon on the article page.

Cover illustration for Form/Work journal-© 2003 Michael Hill.

Cover illustration for Form/Work journal-© 2003 Michael Hill.

This one was put together hurriedly in an afternoon whilst an academic journal on design theory (a special issue on architectural design) was being held up at the printers awaiting a cover illustration. I just grabbed some images from old comics I had in my office, invented some names for theories and collaged the various elements together.

How the cartoon looked on the cover of the journal.

How the cartoon looked on the cover of the journal.

The next one was based on what I saw at an end-of-semester design exhibition student party held on the roof of the Design Faculty building which housed a semi-abstract modernist sculpture that resembled a large scale bottle opener. I watched as this girl wandered up to it with a bottle of beer and proceeded, after a struggle of sorts, to open it, as if it was a functional bottle opener. It worked as she found a chink on the side that fitted her bottle. Then I heard this comment from one of the two onlooking students. No, really!

Form follows function at Design Opening afterparty-© 2003 Michael Hill.

Form follows function at Design Opening afterparty-© 2003 Michael Hill.

How the cartoon looked in the magazine.

How the cartoon looked in the magazine.

 

Posts of my graphic based material include:  THE GRAFIK GUITAR   BOOKBINDING THE GRAFIK GUITAR   CARTOON   MORE CARTOONS   RESEARCH CARTOONS   UNIVERSITY CARTOONS    POSTCARD   POSTCARD-Second Series   POSTCARD-Third Series   POSTCARD-Fourth Series   PRINT Fish Tai   PRINT Fish Two   SCRAPBOOK  SCRAPBOOK-More Pages   SCRAPBOOK-A Few Pages More  and the posts on production of my artist book/comic BLOTTING PAPER:  Issue #1: No.1   No.2   No.3   No.4   No.5   No.6   No.7   No.8   No.9   No.10   No.11   No.12   No.13   Issue #2: No.14   No.15   No.16   No.17   No.18   No.19   No.20   No.21   No.22   No.23   No.24   No.25   No.26   No.27   No.28   No.29   Issue #3: No.30   No.31   No.32   No.33   No.34   No.35   No.36   Issue #4: No.37   No.38   No.39   No.40   No.41   No.42   No.43   No.44   Issue #5: No.45   No.46   No.47   No.48

POSTCARD

This post begins a profile of an artistic activity that I have been active in for a few years, art postcards. These are some of the early cards. More will be added in subsequent posts to this one over time e.g POSTCARD 2, 3 etcetera. I hand-printed postcards created from a combination of drawing and printmaking. I would make odd numbered editions of say 8, 19 or 33. A print run greater than 50 was rare. The total would be determined by the amount of blank cards I had and the available time for production. Once I finished a session that was the end of that particular batch and I would not repeat the design. Cards in an edition are all original prints, similar in design but with no exact duplicates.

First postcard in my Abstract series-© 2006 Michael Hill

Postcard from my Abstract No.1 series-© 2006 Michael Hill

The following three postcards show variations produced in one edition: (1) the overlaid pink patch is in a different position on each card and its shape and colour vary; (2) the dragon stamp is in almost the same position on two cards but not the third and its legs seem absent in two impressions; (3) the large black and yellow mass varies in colour and texture from card to card; (4) the Post Office marking is at the top, bottom or missing; (5) my MH seal, whilst generally in the same position, is upside down on two cards.

A postcard from my Abstract No.2 series-© 2006 Michael Hill

A postcard from my Abstract No.2 series-© 2006 Michael Hill

Another postcard from my Abstract No.2 series-© 2006 Michael Hill

Another postcard from my Abstract No.2 series-© 2006 Michael Hill

A third postcard from my Abstract No.2 series-© 2006 Michael Hill

A third postcard from my Abstract No.2 series-© 2006 Michael Hill

 

Reverse side of postcard from Abstract No.2 series-© 2006 Michael Hill

Reverse side of postcard from Abstract No.2 series-© 2006 Michael Hill

 

A postcard from my Abstract No.3 series-© 2006 Michael Hill

A postcard from my Abstract No.3 series-© 2006 Michael Hill

 

A postcard from my Abstract No.4 series-© 2006 Michael Hill

A postcard from my Abstract No.4 series-© 2006 Michael Hill

 

A postcard from my Abstract No.5 series-© 2006 Michael Hill

A postcard from my Abstract No.5 series-© 2006 Michael Hill

Beer drinking marked the end of an edition to celebrate completion, usually late in the afternoon as I never seem to print in the morning. After a few years I supplemented this hand-made approach with digital printing, making copies from the scanned original.

UPDATE 12 OCT 2015: A selection of these art postcards have been displayed in exhibitions over the past few years, the first in 2007 titled Abstract Nos. 1-11 at the DAB LAB Gallery.

Pop-Up Postcard Exhibition: Abstract Nos.1-11, DAB LAB Gallery, UTS, 2007

Pop-Up Postcard Exhibition: Abstract Nos.1-11, DAB LAB Gallery, UTS, 2007

 

Detail: Pop-Up Postcard Exhibition: Abstract Nos.1-11, DAB LAB Gallery, UTS, 2007

Detail: Pop-Up Postcard Exhibition: Abstract Nos.1-11, DAB LAB Gallery, UTS, 2007

 

Exhibition flyer designed by Michael Hill

Exhibition flyer designed by Michael Hill

Reverse of ABSTRACT exhibition flyer.

Reverse of ABSTRACT exhibition flyer.

UPDATE 6 NOV 2015: At Hondarake Full of Books in 2012 the launch of my artist book/comic Blotting Paper was accompanied by a mini exhibition of 33 0f my art postcards from the Abstract, Landscape and Seasons series. 

An exhibition of postcards accompanying the launch of my artist book/comic Blotting Paper at Hondarake Bookshop, February 2012 (Photo by Louise Graber)

An exhibition of postcards accompanying the launch of my artist book/comic Blotting Paper at Hondarake Bookshop, February 2012 (Photo by Louise Graber)

Fukushima Kids 2013 Auction: 10 postcards, made in small sets of 5-30, each print a monoprint, different and unique. Reverse side is signed and dated plus has artist’s stamp. Cards can be kept or mailed. These postcards were made on machine made cardboard following the Japanese sosaku hanga method of printmaking.

Posts of my graphic based material include:  THE GRAFIK GUITAR   BOOKBINDING THE GRAFIK GUITAR   CARTOON   MORE CARTOONS   RESEARCH CARTOONS   UNIVERSITY CARTOONS    POSTCARD   POSTCARD-Second Series   POSTCARD-Third Series   POSTCARD-Fourth Series    POSTCARD-Fifth Series    PRINT Fish Tai   PRINT Fish Two   SCRAPBOOK  SCRAPBOOK-More Pages   SCRAPBOOK-A Few Pages More  and the posts on production of my artist book/comic BLOTTING PAPER:  Issue #1: No.1   No.2   No.3   No.4   No.5   No.6   No.7   No.8   No.9   No.10   No.11   No.12   No.13   Issue #2: No.14   No.15   No.16   No.17   No.18   No.19   No.20   No.21   No.22   No.23   No.24   No.25   No.26   No.27   No.28   No.29   Issue #3: No.30   No.31   No.32   No.33   No.34   No.35   No.36   Issue #4: No.37   No.38   No.39   No.40   No.41   No.42   No.43   No.44   Issue #5: No.45   No.46   No.47   No.48

SCRAPBOOK

In this post I am profiling another artist book I have made, my scrapbook. Only one copy, it contains images of other people’s work that I admire along with assorted memorabilia of my own. This profile will be ongoing as the book is not yet finished. It does have some history though. Subsequent posts will be added to this one and the content of the book may change over time as images and pages are altered, removed and added. To begin with here are some sample page-spreads.

Double page scrapbook spread in progress.

Double page spread in progress.

Starting with a blank paged, hard-covered sketch book I covered the covers with cloth then painted some of the double page spreads in various colours and a range of textures. To these I added images that I had collected or made, gluing them onto the pages, sometimes in random fashion and other times in related groupings. This relationship might be in terms of colour or commonality of subject or simply a whimsical choice. The above spread shows Kamishibai frame boards on the left and animation drawings by Chuck Jones on the right.

Double page scrapbook spread in progress.

Double page spread in progress.

This spread juxtaposes a theatrical illustration with an add for a Gary Panter book. The white blotch at the join is torn paper, the result of closing the pages before the paint had dried then re-opening them. It looks good though, I think.

Double page scrapbook spread in progress.

Double page spread-prints and seals.

Above are some printmaking images and a selection of Chinese seals.

Double page French spread.

Double page French spread.

Front cover has been covered with cloth.

Front cover has been covered with cloth.

Top edge shows extent of painted and pasted pages.

Top edge shows extent of painted and pasted pages.

Side view of scrapbook on table.

Side view of scrapbook on table.

Posts of my graphic based material include:  THE GRAFIK GUITAR   BOOKBINDING THE GRAFIK GUITAR   CARTOON   MORE CARTOONS   RESEARCH CARTOONS   UNIVERSITY CARTOONS    POSTCARD   POSTCARD-Second Series   POSTCARD-Fourth Series   PRINT Fish Tai   PRINT Fish Two   SCRAPBOOK  SCRAPBOOK-More Pages   SCRAPBOOK-A Few Pages More  and the posts on production of my artist book/comic BLOTTING PAPER:  Issue #1: No.1   No.2   No.3   No.4   No.5   No.6   No.7   No.8   No.9   No.10   No.11   No.12   No.13   Issue #2: No.14   No.15   No.16   No.17   No.18   No.19   No.20   No.21   No.22   No.23   No.24   No.25   No.26   No.27   No.28   No.29   Issue #3: No.30   No.31   No.32   No.33   No.34   No.35   No.36   Issue #4: No.37   No.38   No.39   No.40   No.41   No.42   No.43   No.44   Issue #5: No.45   No.46   No.47   No.48

COFFEE TABLE tenth fix

It’s a yōkai Xmas with master mangaka Shigeru Mizuki material on my coffee table this month! This marvellous creator of both autobiographical and fantasy manga with the gekiga approach to graphic storytelling of placing cartoon style characters over realistically drawn backgrounds has legendary status in Japan but really needs to be better known in the rest of the world.

Mizuki GARO cover.

Mizuki GARO cover of Kitaro carrying a basketful of yokai characters.

After serving in New Guinea in World War II Mizuki got his start in graphic storytelling as an apprentice artist in kamishibai, or paper theatre, in which successively shown painted cards operated and accompanied with vocal and musical narration by a street performer, told a story to audiences standing on street corners in Japan.

Early shape and form of Mizuki 's popular character Kitaro

Early shape and form of Mizuki ‘s popular character Kitaro.

Mizuki moved on to the print media from street theatre, making manga for the rental market and participating in the emerging gekiga form of alternative comics developed by Yoshihiro Tatsumi. Interested in the ghosts and spirits of Japanese folk tales he developed his Kitaro character in a series of yōkai stories based on a popular kamishibai play by Masami Ito called Hakaba Kitaro from 1930s.

Early shape and form of Mizuki 's popular character Kitaro.

Early shape and form of Mizuki ‘s character Kitaro with his father Medama Oyaji.

Mizuki found an outlet for his stories in GARO magazine, an anthology publication of alternative manga. There he gained an assistant, Yoshiharu Tsuge, the developer of nejishiki, or Screw Style manga.

Early shape and form of Mizuki 's popular character Kitaro.

Kitaro’s father Medama Oyaji.

In the stories Kitaro’s deceased father reanimates himself as an eyeball and, with the eyeball as a head, grows a new body, hangs out in Kitaro’s hair and his hollow eye socket(Kitaro has lost one eye) and tries to help his son with his adventures.

Early shape and form of Mizuki 's character Kitaro. with Ratman.

Kitaro with father and Nezumi Otoko.

Shigeru Mizuki 's popular character Kitaro.

Shigeru Mizuki ‘s popular character Kitaro.

Recently four of Mizuki’s works have been translated into English and published by Drawn & Quarterly. I expect he will become more better known outside Japan both for his manga GeGeGe no Kitaro and his interest and expertise in yōkai. 

The Mizuki manga about the old woman who taught him yokai.

The Mizuki manga about the old woman who taught him yokai.

Autobiographically based war comic.

Autobiographically based war comic.

In Onwards Towards Our Noble Deaths (originally published as Soin gyokusai seyo! in 1973) based on his own experiences in the Japanese army in New Guinea during World War II, he portrays the sadistic officers who, driven by their ideological beliefs, were cruel to their own troops. Still, Mizuki manages to find several humorous anecdotes of life in wartime and the determination to survive.

Japanese history gets the Mizuki mix of cartoons and realism-Vols.1 & 2

Japanese history gets the Mizuki mix of cartoons and realism-Vols.1 & 2

Japanese history gets the Mizuki mix of cartoons and realism-Vols.3 & 4

Japanese history gets the Mizuki mix of cartoons and realism-Vols.3 & 4

SHOWA 1926-1989 is a four volume history presented in manga form with contrasting graphic treatments of the history portrayed-the newspaper/media representation running alongside the cartoon adventures of Mizuki and his family living that history or the effects of it. Happy Xmas Shigeru!

UPDATE 30 NOV 2015: Sad news breaking that Mizuki has died today, aged 93.

CupofCoffee-1RRead the other coffee table entries:  COFFEE TABLE first fix(Day of the Dead/Halloween comics)   COFFEE TABLE fourth fix(Football comics)     COFFEE TABLE eighth fix(Hergé and Tintin)    COFFEE TABLE tenth fix(Shigeru Mizuki)

COFFEE TABLE eighth fix

Continuing with my plan to profile a comics coffee table art book every month or so and make a scene of it, this time round it’s a tip of the hat to Hergé and his creation Tintin. This post is new. There are links to the older ones at the end. I have assembled collected editions of the complete set of albums in the reduced size format, a copy of the Tintin magazine Le Journal Des Jeunes De 7 A 77 Ans, some scholarly works, items of clothing and accessories, a DVD set and a previously published, related bande dessinée franco-belge exhibition review.

Tintin stuff (Art direction and photography-© 2013 Louise Graber)

Tintin stuff (Art direction and photography-© 2013 Louise Graber)

Tintin magazine, No. 467, October 1957.

Tintin magazine, No. 467, October 1957.

The Benoît Peeters study of Tintin and Hergé.

The Benoît Peeters study of Tintin and Hergé.

The Michael Farr Tintin companion book

The Michael Farr Tintin companion book.

The Adventures of Tintin in albums, as the French call them, totalling 24 in all including the unfinished final one, were executed in the attractive ligne clair or clear line drawing style that was developed by Hergé and his colleague and collaborator Edgar Pierre Jacobs. I never read these as a child. I was given comic books by Carl Barks and Hank Ketcham then and didn’t get to Tintin till my late-adolescence and early adulthood and only briefly at that.  It wasn’t until the English translations had been published that they began to appear. They were the first comics I found in libraries. Librarians seemed to like acquiring them. I suspected the fact that they came in hardcovers and not the soft, pamphlet form of US comics made them seem more like books and right for library collections. And groups of boys tended to monopolise the borrowing of them to the extent that it was really difficult to find them on the shelves. Re-reading the Tintin comics now with their beautiful colour and the drawing, the adventures in unfamiliar geography, the abusive babble from Haddock and the amusement provided by the surprising amount of slapstick I am taken back to boyhood whilst my appreciation of bande dessinée and the Ninth Art is extended.

A volume of the collected works in the reduced size format.

A volume of the collected works in the reduced size format.

Another Tintin study book-this one by Harry Thompson (no relation).

Another Tintin study book-this one by Harry Thompson (no relation to the twins).

Comic Strip, Passion’s Trip exhibition, Sydney, Alliance Francais de Sydney November 18-December 20, 2002, review by Michael Hill, first published in International Journal of Comic Art, Vol.5 No.1 Spring/Summer 2003

The “Tintin” Qantas Flight 714 finally touched down in Sydney in November 2002. Originally carrying Tintin and his associates to a scientific symposium in Sydney in the Herge comic Flight 714 to Sydney (1968) his party left the plane in Jakarta and went off on a private jet and another adventure. Now, 34 years later, Tintin, in the shape of a cargo of beer, chocolates and comics, three of Belgium’s significant export commodities, as well as members of the Royal family and an exhibition of French language Belgian comics titled Comic Strip, Passion’s Trip has arrived.

For a country that exports considerable quantities of comics (65% of publication exports) and which refers to comics as the Ninth Art and so has a museum devoted to comics, it was no surprise that the exhibition was opened by members of the Belgian monarchy, Prince Philippe and Princess Mathilde, giving the exercise the Royal seal of approval. The exhibition formed part of an economic mission organised by the Wallonia-Brussels Sydney Trade Office. 300 different titles in French plus a further 70 in English were shipped to Sydney and put on sale in Dymocks, one of the city’s larger bookshops, creating a mini-venue for Euro comics to compete with the growing presence in the local retail market of Japanese manga and Hong Kong comics.

The exhibition was staged at Alliance Francais de Sydney, a combination gallery, café and French language teaching centre. It was a noisey location next to a city bus stop but this was a bonus for waiting passengers as they could admire the window display of merchandise and old comics and the staged acrobatics of a large model of the André Franquin character Marsupilami. The exhibition had undergone a serious design process by the curator Jean-Marie Derscheid and had a multi-strand focus: the exhibition of actual comic books, original art and rough process art, a display revealing the workings of the artist’s studio, a child’s bedroom decorated with comics merchandise and videos, and a gigantic mock-up comic book album, 82cm (heigth) x 56 cm (width), beautifully bound and designed, contextualising Belgium comics and featuring brief biographies and examples of the work of 20 significant artists: Didier Comes, André Franquin, Greg, Hergé, Hermann Huppen, Edgar Pierre Jacobs, Jijie, Lambil, Raymond Macherot, Morris, Peyo, Francois Schuiten, Jean-Claude Servais, Tibet, Maurice Tillieux, Tome and Janry, Will, and Yslaire. References were made to Spirou magazine and to two emergent schools of comics: the Brussels School and the Marcinelle School.

The bed in the child’s room had a Tintin doona cover and bed sheets, a Gaston Lagaffe reading lamp, a Marsupilami alarm clock, various posters and a cupboard containing Lucky Luke figurines. Surprisingly there was not a Smurf in sight. The room also had a small television and vcr with a collection of Belgian animated cartoon series. Amusingly, by the end of the opening night, the child’s room was littered with empty beer bottles from the large crowd viewing the exhibition, giving the installation a bizarre visual association between beer and comics in the nursery. The child’s room, the mock-up of the studio and the giant book brought to the exhibition features not available in the normal process of reading the comic books.

Another section of the exhibition consisted of individual displays of the work of particular artists. These included examples of original artwork and a copy of the comic album that was accessible for visitors to read (some appeared quite soiled near the end of the exhibition) and collaborative partnerships including Hermann, Geerts, Midam, Yslaire, Morris, Jacobs, Herge, Francois and Luc Schuiten, Francqu and Van Hamme, Dufaux and Marini, Lambil, Marc Bnoyninx, Tome and Janry, Constant and Vandamme

Upstairs in a small seminar room there was a mock-up called  ‘the artist’s studio.’ Large blow-up photographs on the walls showed the interiors of various comic book creators’ work spaces although these were not identified. A working drawing table had been set up with pencils and other equipment, again more of a generic than specific representation, and there was a video corner screening a documentary on one of the featured artists, Frank, at work on illustrations for the comic book about Australia which had been scheduled to be released for the exhibition. His watercolour sketches of Australian animals were impressive. In the current ‘making of’ climate being reinforced by DVDs of particular films, this part of the exhibition seemed timely.

Although there was no exhibition catalogue a special edition comic book The Source by Frank was specially commissioned and published for the exhibition. Set in Australia, even though the creator had never been there prior to the exhibition (Frank came to Sydney for the opening) his story was based in the desert and although his use of colour was accurate some of his content was neither sensitive nor politically correct. Based on an attempt to move what he insensitively refers to as Ayers Rock, a giant natural rock formation now known as Uluru having reverted to the control of the indigenous owners several years ago and consequently treated as a sacred place, Frank plays with Aboriginal art and icons, a practice which local artists respect as the cultural domain of the indigenous people. Conscious of the lack of local knowledge perhaps, and in tongue-in-cheek fashion, the exhibition points to “our delightfully cliched images of Australia: kangaroos, boomerangs, mythical Aborigines and smouldering red deserts.”

But this exhibition was about culture in any case: the culture of a country where comics have been elevated to the level of art, are treasured, and are collected by libraries and museums; and a culture where comic books are also treated as consumables, collected, handled, read, and integrated into everyday life as objects of desire.

The exhibition brochure with Illustration by Frank.

The exhibition brochure with illustration by Frank.

CupofCoffee-1RRead the coffee table entries:  COFFEE TABLE first fix(Day of the Dead/Halloween comics)    COFFEE TABLE fourth fix(Football comics)    COFFEE TABLE eighth fix(Hergé and Tintin)   COFFEE TABLE tenth fix(Shigeru Mizuki). There is also my review of an art exhibition by Nick Stathopoulos that features portraits of Tintin: DOMO ARIGATO MR.ROBOTO: Toy Porn 2 Review and my profile of Joann Sfar’s bande dessinée The Rabbi’s Cat.

 

COFFEE TABLE fourth fix

There are football (or soccer) comics on the coffee table this month. I’m currently watching matches from the English Premier League, the FA Cup, the German BundesligaSpanish La Liga, Italian Serie A, the Japanese J. League and the local Australian A-League. Last year I saw a really good FIFA World Cup qualifying match in Brisbane between Australia (Socceroos) and Japan (Blue Samurai) and recently I attended a Sydney FC match and witnessed the Italian master Alessandro Del Piero (a.k.a. the little painter) play. Del Piero says he was inspired to play football by the Japanese animation and manga character Captain Tsubasa (see image below). Growing up in Australia with the SBS television broadcaster, the Special Broadcasting Service, I was aware of football’s cultural origins. Due to its coverage of ethnic programs SBS became an amusing acronym in the schoolyard for ‘Soccer Bloody Soccer’ especially for followers of the other football codes such as rugby league, rugby union and Australian rules, and later with it’s screening of adult art films prior to the early morning broadcast of live football matches from Europe, ‘Sex Before Soccer’.

Comic Book Guy red carded for invading the pitch. (Photo and staging by Michael Hill a.k.a. Doctor Comics)

Comic Book Guy red carded for invading the pitch. (Photo and staging by Michael Hill a.k.a. Doctor Comics)

So some of my set of Simpsons soccer figures and Comic Book Guy comics are in play this time. I’m not sure whether Simpsons creator Matt Groening is a football fan or not but following the repertory nature of the show the cast was kitted out to fill a couple of soccer teams with Mr. Burns as the referee. Comic Book Guy seems to be miscast here, invading the playing field and shown the red card by referee Burns for not being a member of either team. There is no sign of the ball, lost perhaps in the long grass. Springfield is not known for its smooth playing surfaces. Perhaps Homer was supposed to mow it but forgot?

Comic Book Guy in his own series plus his enormous cosplay effort on Free Comic Book Day.

Comic Book Guy in his own series plus his enormous cosplay effort on Free Comic Book Day.

The Jack Kirby cover for the first issue of The Fantastic Four.

The Jack Kirby cover for the first issue of The Fantastic Four.

In the recent comic book series Death of Comic Book Guy, the first issue cover is a pastiche of the Jack Kirby design for The Fantastic Four #1 back in November 1961 with Comic Book Guy trading places with The Thing, Bart with Human Torch, and Homer with Invisible Girl(see above). Oh, did I forget to mention Billy the Fish?

Captain Tsubasa manga

Captain Tsubasa manga: Road To 2002 Vol.10 (2002 FIFA World Cup campaign)

All of the figurines in the set.

All of the figurines in the set.

Springfield's finest-Homer with ball-Simpsons soccer trading card.

Springfield’s finest-Homer with ball-The Simpsons soccer trading card.

Grampa stops the ball in The Simpsons Springfield soccer team trading cards.

Grampa stops the ball in The Simpsons Springfield soccer team trading cards.

UPDATE #1(February 2014): The Simpsons show is currently cartoonising some of the members of English Premier League club Chelsea FC. (L to R in the photo below) are Eden Hazard, Fernando Torres, John Terry, Frank Lampard and Petr Cech.

Chelsea FC players standing behind their Simpsonised characters.

Chelsea FC players standing behind their Simpsonised characters.

UPDATE #2(June 2014): On a recent visit to Germany I picked up a football comic at a comics convention. (See cover below)

A German football comic reprinted in time for the 2014 World Cup.

A German football comic reprinted in time for the 2014 World Cup.

CupofCoffee-1RRead all the coffee table entries imported from Doctor Comictopus blog:  COFFEE TABLE first fix(Day of the Dead/Halloween comics)      COFFEE TABLE fourth fix(Football comics)   COFFEE TABLE eighth fix(Hergé and Tintin)    COFFEE TABLE tenth fix(Shigeru Mizuki)